A little bit of history

In 1848, Queen Victoria bought Balmoral Castle on Speyside, and in 1853, Albert himself designed The Balmoral Tartan for his Queen.

The Callanish Stone Circle stands proud and sentinel on the west coast of The Isle of Lewis. The magic and the mystery surrounding the magnificent Callanish site goes all the way back to when the stones were first erected in 2,693BC.

Queen Victoria, The Balmoral tartan, and the magical and mysterious Callanish Stone Circle, were the inspiration behind The Callanish Tartan, Scotland's first ever registered Harris Tweed tartan.

In 1846 the Harris Tweed Industry began to thrive, thanks to The Lady Dunmore, whose husband Lord Dunmore, owned the Isles of Lewis and Harris. She began to weave the family tartan, The Murray of Atholl, and then to market and sell Harris Tweed around Europe.
To commemorate this outstandin event, Malcolm the weaver has designed and registered ' The Lady Dunmore', a noble Scottish plaid woven in Harris Tweed.

'The Callanish' and ' The Lady Dunmore' are the two most attractive Harris Tweed designs ever woven in the majestic Cloth of Kings.

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Malcolm the Weaver

In the year of our Lord 1969, in the Scottish fishin town of Dunbar, it was a turnin point for one wee Scots laddie.

Malcolm Campbell was fifteen and a half years old, he was in two minds and muddled about what he wid dae with himsel for the rest of his life. He had taken art at school, textile design sounded good.

His favourite painter was Vincent Van Gogh, Le Tisserand, ‘the weaver’, frae 1889, his best paintin. “Why not study textile design?

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And so began a five year apprenticeship as a weaver at A&J MacNab of Haddington, eleven miles from where he lived in Scotland. It wis the same Mill that his mother had worked for, with Willie Taylor, the same boss.

That was it, his career had begun. A career in tweed and worsted cloth, that spanned over forty years, with Malcolm the hied one in textile designin, sellin, and marketin as well, fir half a dozen of the biggest textile firms in both Scotland and Yorkshire. He did guie weel fir himsel.

Travelin around the world, developin, creatin and sellin innovative new cloth that naebody had thought of designin before.

In 2006, he wis awarded with three accolades from the textile industry. They made him a Fellow of The Textile Institute, The Society of Dyers and Colourists and The Royal Society of Arts as well. He was well chuffed and proud to say the least. February 2010 a letter poppit through the letter box, that would change Malcolm the weavers life forever.

“The Master of the Household has received Her Majesty’s command to invite Mr Malcolm Campbell to a Reception to be given at Buckingham Palace by The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh for the British Clothing Industry on Tuesday 16th March at 6.00pm” A reply is requested.

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Malcolm introduced himself to Her Majesty The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh as ‘Malcolm the Scottish weaver’. Her Majesty was beguiled with stories of tartan, of wool, of sheep, of Harris Tweed, and of Scotland and she was well impressed with tales of Scotland’s textile heritage.

Malcolm was invited to visit the magnificent Kensington Palace to see the Royal Archive of claethes that had been worn by Queen Victoria and claethes worn too by The Prince of Wales. What he saw at Kensington Palace was enthrallin. Queen Victoria’s favourite outfits, The Balmoral Tartan, that Albert himsel had designed for her. Edward V111 shootin jacket and huntin breeches, amazin. The Cloth of Kings became Malcolm the weavers dream.

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The Lady Dunmore

The Harris Tweed Industry began to thrive in 1846, thanks to The Lady Dunmore, whose husband Lord Dunmore, owned the Isle of Harris and the Isle of Lewis.

She began to hand loom weave the family tartan, The Murray of Atholl, in Harris Tweed - An Clo Mor - and then to market and sell it to her wealthy friends around Europe for between three shillings and sixpence and three shillings and nine pence for a yard of Harris Tweed.

It was this design that created a weaving industry that grew to its peak in 1966, when seven million metres of narrow width cloth was being woven by over a thousand hand loom weavers.
To commemorate this outstanding event, Malcolm the weaver has designed and registered ' The Lady Dunmore ' a noble Scottish Plaid woven in Harris Tweed in the colours of The Murray of Atholl tartan, in respect of The Lady Dunmore.

The Callanish Tartan and The Lady Dunmore Plaid are the two most attractive Harris Tweeds ever to be woven in the Majestic Cloth of Kings.

Finishing

The Callanish Tartan tweed and The Lady Dunmore Plaid are two unique Harris Tweed cloths, enhanced for handle, appearance and performance.

The wool is dyed, carded and spun on the Isle of Lewis, warped at the Mill, then hand loom woven by artisan crofter weavers, before being finished at the Mill, and stamped for authenticity with the Harris Tweed Orb.

The cloth is then rolled, packed and sent down to Yorkshire, where the best textile finishers in the World crop and press the cloth for performance and handle, then scientifically treat the tweed to make it shower proof to keep you dry, stain resist to keep it clean, and add silver particles to keep it fresh and odour free.

A true blend of science and nature.

The cloth is then further improved for construction in to bags, toilet bag, shotgun slips and cartridge bags, by being laminated to create a totally impermeable water proof fabric, ideal for travel, outdoors, and country pursuits.

Not once in the long history of Harris Tweed - An Clo Mor - have these unique, clever and exclusive finishes been applied to the tweeds.

The cloth is very special indeed, and creats an outstanding range of products which will be well protected and preserved with The Cloth of Kings special finishes.

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